The purpose of this piece is to provide even the most novice sports bettor a look into the different aspects of sports betting. The focus of this particular article is on how to bet college football via teasers. When it comes to gambling, NCAA football is a completely different beast than its NFL counterpart. College football betting provides gamblers with a greater slate of games throughout the week compared to the NFL, including usually 25 plus matchups on Saturdays alone.

Now there are a lot of different betting options to consider when it comes to College football. Not only are there sides (point-spread) and totals (over/under), but there are also parlays and teasers. The majority of people bet sides, totals, and parlays, but there is some money to be made betting teasers. So, let’s break down that type of wager a little bit more in detail below.

What is a teaser?

A teaser is a special, multi-leg bet in which you are able to adjust the point spread or total for a game.

The most common types of teasers are two-team, six-point or two-team, seven-point. Some books also offer three-team, ten-point teasers. These points are added to the underdog or subtracted from the favorite. Teasers are considered favorable bets because they give bettors extra points, but as with parlays, you must win every individual leg of your bet to win your wager.

Let’s take a look at some teaser examples. To do so, we will use a Florida-Miami matchup as our guide.

The odds for that game sit at:

Florida -7
Miami +7
Total: 47

First, let’s start with a two-team, six-point teaser. Since the line is -7, and you are betting a 6-point teaser, your new line would be -1 if you take Florida. On the flip side, betting the underdog in that situation would bump that number up to Miami +13.

If you did a two-team, seven-point teaser in the same game, your new lines would either be Florida pk ‘em, or Miami +14.

If you were looking to tease the total in the aforementioned game you would be able to manipulate the line to either under 53 or over 41 (two-team, six-point teaser).

Basically, if I was going to wager on the game was putting in a teaser, my teaser bet would look like this:

Florida +14 and Over 41. Remember, you have to win both individual legs to win your teaser bet.

Typically the price on a two-team, six-point teaser is -120 (bet $120 to win $100) while a three-teamer pays out at +180 (bet $100 to win $180). Be mindful that if a game falls on the adjusted number, the bet is reduced by one (i.e.: a three-teamer becomes a two-teamer). Note that in the event of a tie in one leg of a two-teamer, the bet is a push, no matter if the other selection wins or loses.

Teasers vs. Parlays

A teaser is similar to a parlay, as in all of the legs of the individual games need to win in order for you to win your wager. But a teaser differs from a parlay because you put points down in your favor to help the bet come to fruition. A parlay on the other hand, the lines stay the same.

Using the same Florida-Miami example above, if you did a parlay, you’d be taking say Florida -7 or Miami + 7 and Over/ Under 47. Whereas if you use the teaser example above, you are getting more favorable lines as we discussed.

Because of that fact that a parlay line stays the same, they pay out at much better odds than a teaser. Because of the better payouts, parlays also seem to be more popular with bettors overall.
A two-team parlay generally pays out at +260 (bet $100 to win $260), 6-1 for a three-team parlay, 10-1 for a four-team parlay, and the numbers go up exponentially from there. That is, because the wagers become tougher to win with the more teams you add.
A lot of beginner gamblers often like betting parlays because they can wager a smaller amount to start with, but have that opportunity to win a lot of money. Basically, these same types of bettors consider parlays their lottery tickets. Just as winning the lottery is tough, the same goes for parlays. Remember, the odds are stacked against you, so sportsbooks will generally win if you just bet parlays more often than not.
Teasers are not sure things either. It’s harder to sweep two plays, even with six or seven bonus points per game, then most bettors realize.
With that being said, professional bettors do prefer teasers over parlays, and let’s take a look at why next.

Advantages of College Football Teasers

Because of the importance of key numbers in football betting, the teaser can actually be a profitable strategy on point-spreads. A good basic strategy for you to start with would be to include underdogs — not favorites — and to get as many points through the key football numbers of 3, 4, 6, 7.

Why underdogs? Most new bettors want to bet on favorites because they feel more comfortable rooting for the superior team. In their head, “Those 7-point favorites are going to kill these underdogs! I can get them both at pk ‘em. This is easy money.”

Just remember, big favorites don’t win by big margins as often as you think they do. If they did, then gambling would be easy, and we’d all be rich!

So if you are going to go the teaser route, as mentioned above, go with dogs. Overall, if you’re able to move multiple teams through the main key numbers of 3 and 7, for example, you give yourself an edge in winning more long-term. As we all know, when it comes to gambling, every advantage and dollar counts. And, that is why some “sharp”s prefer teasers over parlays (lottery tickets).

There’s still a lot to consider if you want to make regular and consistent profits when betting via teasers. The bookmakers are very good at setting these lines, so you’ll rarely find spots where it’s obvious which way you should bet. You’ve got to do your research and try to make genuinely informed judgements. You need to be patient too, and wait for the right opportunities. Now, go get them!